April 24, 2021

This week in community building — Issue 82

topics: curation
Rosie Sherry
Hey everyone, we recognize that for many — this is an emotional week ahead of us.

Make sure you're giving everyone the right amount of emotional bandwidth and space in your communities. This may look different for everyone, and different for the different roles you may take in their own communities.

We believe in empathetic, human-first communities, that allow people to show up as they are.

Oh, and at Rosieland — Black Lives Matter, Trans Lives Matter, Stop Asian Hate, and no hateful, sexist, racist, or discriminatory actions will be tolerated.

Below are some resources for you to help read and navigate this space.

As always, sending love and light wherever you may be in this world. 🕯


❤️

“Maybe the kind of reform that we want comes from creators being like, ‘I’m done'”

Charlie Warzel on newsletters, platforms, reporting, editing, and luck.

By NiemanLabs

Right now these platforms have so much control, just by how they can tweak an algorithm or a set of policies that changes how someone gets paid. In some ways that’s like taxation without representation. Maybe the kind of reform that we want for certain parts of the internet comes from creators being like: OK, well, I’m done. Or: I’m not going there. Or: You need to disclose how this part of the algorithm works so that I’m not left in the cold when you change something.


Consider the quasi-commune

By Anne Helen Peterson

Communes were and are created as an antidote, or at very least an alternative, to capitalism. And the most anti-capitalistic thing about them is their clear-eyed commitment to community interdependence, which, as Jezer-Morton writes, “requires us to give up our stubborn belief in the myth that we have complete autonomy over how we spend our time.”



🗞 News



🎧 Podcasts & Videos



🥳 Community of the Week


Fat Besties is a grassroots community for fat positivity for people in Canada. Fat Besties has a blog, events, and an online community.


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—Rosie Sherry